Children will not be at any risk from the third wave of Corona, these two vaccines are proving to be effective

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Sally Permer of New York-Presbyterian CommonSky Children’s Hospital in America said, safe and effective vaccines for young children will help limit the spread of Covid-19.

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New York. Moderna’s Kovid-19 vaccine (Covid-19) and another protein-based experimental vaccine are safe and effective antibodies to fight the SARS-Cov-2 virus in initial trials on children of a species of monkey, rhesus macaque. have been proved. Research published on Tuesday in the journal Science Immunology indicates that vaccines for children may prove to be an effective weapon in reducing the magnitude of the epidemic.

Sally Permer of New York-Presbyterian CommonSky Children’s Hospital in the US said, “Safe and effective vaccines for young children will help limit the spread of Kovid-19.” Parmer said, the restrictions imposed to prevent infection had many more negative effects on children. That’s why children are entitled to the vaccine to be protected from Kovid-19. According to the research paper, the ability to fight the virus was maintained for 22 weeks due to the vaccine in 16 young monkeys of the rhesus macaque species. Researchers are conducting a challenging study this year to generate a potential long-term protective shield from the vaccine.

Professor Christina de Paris at the University of North Carolina in the US said, “We are looking at potential antibody levels by comparing them to adult macaques.” However, macaque children were given only 30 micrograms of the vaccine, compared to 100 micrograms for adults. Researchers claim that after both vaccines, antibodies developed in young monkeys and a remarkable response of spike protein-specific T cells was revealed.

De Paris said, “In Moderna’s vaccine, we saw a strong T cell response, which we know is important in limiting disease severity.” About two months of age, 16 macaque babies were divided into two groups of eight and vaccinated, and then revaccinated four weeks later. Each animal was given a preclinical variant of a modern mRNA-based vaccine or a protein-based vaccine developed by the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAIAD).

The mRNA-based vaccine instructs the body to produce a virus surface protein, also known as a spike protein. This allows human immune cells to recognize these proteins and produce antibodies as well as take other measures for immunization. The NIAID vaccine is actually a spike protein that the immune system detects in a similar way.